Richard Meros salutes the Southern Man

RE-RELEASED IN MARCH 2012
WITH INTRODUCTION BY DUNCAN SARKIES
AND SCRIPT OF THE THEATRICAL ADAPTATION BY ARTHUR MEEK AND GEOFF PINFIELD

LG002

pp. 134

second edition released March 2012


“I salute you, Richard Meros, for reawakening me, and I stand behind you or beside you (whichever you prefer) and I join you, humbly and fervently, in your salutation of the Southern Man.” – from the introduction by Duncan Sarkies, Two Little Boys, Scarfies

On the first edition: “Meros ... (is a) literary spirit to be greatly encouraged, prankster descendant, dare one say it, of Laurence Sterne. And I can think of no higher praise than that.” - Guy Somerset, The Dominion Post, dompost.co.nz


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AND/EITHER/OR: we still have half-of-a-dozen of the first edition in our stocks. These are the second run of this edition, but the text remains the same.


LG002

pp. 96

first edition/second print run 2008


Having escaped the backlash of certain literati circles and harsh reviews of his punctuation and grammar, the elusive Meros went into hiding, recuperating in various author safe-houses around South America. Passing the hours he began to fondly recall his time spent living in a small southern town in New Zealand where he had become entwined in its many charming rituals, such as hay-baling.

The result is a surprising, pathos-filled and sometimes hilarious tribute to the Southern Man that not only explores one of the most complex and significant cultural bastions of New Zealand but muses upon his place on the world stage to come.

 

As corporations and conglomerates establish a foot-hold over New Zealand agriculture, Meros takes stock of the legendary Southern Man.

 

Does he exist?

Where might I find him?

What of the Southern Woman?

 

"There is a difference between these people and you and I," Meros affirms. "While we sit here sipping our frappa-mocha-whatevers, they are dealing with the intimacies of living close to their earth. Their bodies become hard while we peddle our papers."



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